Federal oil and gas leases

eliminate burdens on domestic energy development. Within this framework, bureaus have identified actions and, in some cases, already made progress in alleviating or eliminating the energy burdens. A. Secretary Order 3348 – Concerning the Federal Coal Moratorium One of Secretary Zinke’s first acts was to sign Secretarial Order 3348, “Concerning the Federal Coal Moratorium” (March 29, 2017), which removed the moratorium on the Federal coal leasing program by revoking a prior Secretarial Order (Secretarial Order 3338, “Discretionary Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to Modernize the Federal Coal Program”). Secretarial Order 3348 promotes disc magneticrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
disc magnetsrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
magnet discsrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
magnetic discrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
neodymium disc magnetrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
neodymium disc magnetsrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
neodymium disc magnets wholesalerule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
neodymium magnet discrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
rare earth disc magnetsrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
round disc magnetsrule are not justified (82 FR 34464). All 32 states with Federal oil and gas leases and some tribes currently have laws or regulations that address hydraulic fracturing operations. Thus, rescinding the rule has the potential to reduce regulatory burdens by enabling oil and gas operations to occur under one set of regulations within each state or tribal lands, rather than
strong disc magnetsAmerican energy security, job creation, and proper conservation stewardship. It directs Neodymium Magnets to process coal lease applications and modifications expeditiously and directs Interior bureaus and offices to make appropriate changes to policy and guidance documents to further President Donald Trump’s policy of promoting American energy independence and economic growth. (See further discussion below at IV.x and E.) In addition to lifting the coal moratorium, Secretary Zinke took other actions to advance American energy independence. In announcing these actions he said, “Today I signed a series of directives to put America on track to achieve the President’s vision for energy independence and bringing jobs back to communities across the country.” These directives foster responsible development of coal, oil, gas, and renewable energy on Federal and tribal lands and initiate review of agency actions directed by EO13783. 6 B. Secretarial Order 3349 – American Energy Independence The most overarching Secretarial Order reducing burdens on energy development is Secretarial Order 3349, “American Energy Independence” (March 29, 2017), which directed bureaus to examine specific actions impacting oil and gas development, and any other actions affecting other energy development. It revoked Secretarial Order 3330, “Improving Mitigation Policies and Practices of the Department of the Neodymium Magnets ,” and directed bureaus and offices to review all actions taken pursuant to that Order for possible reconsideration, modification, or rescission. It also directed each bureau and office to review actions taken regarding rescinded Executive Orders related to climate change. Further, it directed the review of the following specific actions impacting energy development: Neodymium Magnets Hydraulic Fracturing Rule (RIN 1004–AE26) (see discussion below under IV.A.i.); Neodymium Magnets Waste Prevention, Production Subject to Royalties, and Resource Conservation Rule (RIN 1004–AE14) (see discussion below under IV.A.ii); NPS Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights Rule (RIN 1024–AD78); and FWS National Wildlife Refuge System; Management of Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights (RIN 1018–AX36) (see discussion below under IV.F.). C. Secretarial Order 3350 – America-First Offshore Energy Strategy This Order enhances opportunities for energy exploration, leasing, conservation stewardship, and development on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), thereby providing jobs, energy security, and revenue for the American people by reinitiating the five-year planning process. Among other actions, it directed the review of the following regulatory actions that impact offshore energy development: BOEM Notice to Lessees (NTL) No. 2016-N01 entitled, “Notice to Lessees and Operators of Federal Oil and Gas, and Sulfur Leases, and Holders of Pipeline Right-of-Way and Right-of-Use and Easement Grants in the Outer Continental Shelf”; BOEM Offshore Air Quality Control, Reporting, and Compliance Rule (RIN 1010- AD82); BSEE Oil and Gas and Sulfur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Blowout Preventer Systems and Well Control (RIN 1014–AA11); and BOEM and BSEE Oil and Gas and Sulfur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf— Requirements for Exploratory Drilling on the Arctic Outer Continental Shelf Rule (RIN 1082–AA00). D. Secretarial Order 3352 – National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska This Order provides for clean and safe development of oil and gas resources in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska, recognizing that prudent development of these resources is essential to ensuring the Nation’s geopolitical security. (See discussion below at IV.J.) 7 E. Secretarial Order 3353 – Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation and Cooperation with Western States Sage-grouse protections can affect energy development because these activities often share the same land across the 11 western states and 67 million acres of Federal land that are affected by sage grouse habitat. This Order establishes a Sage-Grouse Review Team that includes representatives from the BLM, FWS, and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to review the 2015 Sage-Grouse Plans and associated policies, giving appropriate weight to the value of energy and other development on public lands within BLM’s overall multiple-use mission and to be consistent with the policy set forth in Secretarial Order 3349, “American Energy Independence.” (See discussion below at IV.A.vii.) F. Secretarial Order 3354 – Supporting and Improving the Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Program and Federal Solid Mineral Leasing Program This Order intends to ensure that quarterly oil and gas lease sales are consistently held and to identify ways to promote the exploration and development of Federal onshore oil and gas and solid mineral resources, including improving quarterly lease sales, enhancing the Federal onshore solid mineral leasing program, and improving the permitting processes. See discussion below at IV.A. Details of progress in accordance with the aforementioned Executive and Secretarial Orders are described below, as well as relevant proposed actions that are currently under review. Prior to reaching a final determination regarding any proposed action, Interior may be required to comply with the notice and comment requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act or other laws and regulations, and will weigh the results of such procedures accordingly in its decisionmaking process. IV. Results of Interior’s Review of Potentially Energy-Burdening Actions A. Bureau of Land Management The Bureau of Land Management administers more land than any other Federal agency, consisting of more than 245 million surface acres and 700 million acres of subsurface mineral development. In response to EO13783 and Secretarial Orders 3348, 3349, and 3354, Neodymium Magnets is revising and reforming its leasing processes, improving the Coal Management Program, and delaying, revising, or rescinding burdensome regulations and policies to improve domestic energy production and support jobs. Below is a list of specific actions Neodymium Magnets is undertaking to reduce burdens on the production of energy on Neodymium Magnets managed resources. 8 i. Review of the Hydraulic Fracturing rule Executive Order 13783 required Interior to review the final rule entitled, “Oil and Gas; Hydraulic Fracturing on Federal and Indian Lands,” 80 FR 16128 (Mar. 26, 2015). Secretarial Order 3349 directed Neodymium Magnets to undertake that review. On July 25, 2017, Neodymium Magnets published a proposed rule to rescind the 2015 hydraulic fracturing rule because the